PROJECT 2:
SIMULATION & DESIGN








Project Description:

Sushi Dinner, is an all you can eat sushi smorgasbord simulation. Mukbang youtubers gather around the table eating and creating a cacophony of munching, crunching, and slurping paired with the distant sound of the ocean waves.

Overfishing and overconsumption of fish, especially predatory fish such as bluefin tuna, and cod have depleted fish populations to dangerously low levels affecting the fragile ecosystems of the ocean. In “Apocalypse Now: The End of Fish,” Daniel Pauly, a Marine Ecologist compares eating a sushi roll to being as environmentally damaging as driving a Hummer or harpooning a manatee. Could this simulation bring awareness to the overconsumption? Can we control the amount of fish consumed each year?


 


Project Brief:

How can the designer/artist use simulation critically, productively, originally? How does one shift their attention from questions of form to questions of behavior and performance (or are they the same thing)? When using tools developed for specific industries (namely, gaming and visual effects) does one intervene to default qualities of the expected use? Does the capability of creating digital models capable of self-generating and simulating outcomes alter one's perceptions as a maker in general?

Climatological, social, and technological changes are occurring increasingly at a global, rather than regional, scale. While addressing issues of this complexity has always required the collaboration of multiple forms of scientific expertise, inexpensive super-computation and accessible software allows designers to engage with topics long considered strictly the purview of these scientific researchers and engineers.

For this project, you will create a vivarium: a micro-world where a defined set of properties and behaviors are placed and developed. As a starting point, you will be assigned one of the following verbs, each inspired by a current global crisis, nearing a tipping point: a condition where a controlling system is overwhelmed, sometimes beyond potential return or repair.